At RUNative ad compliance is our number one priority and we pride ourselves on making sure each publisher get to chose the extra content they are willing to accept on their website.
To ensure this we manually check and flag each campaign on submission and on a regular basis. 

Runative's flagging system categorises each campaign and every campaign in our inventory by vertical, ad image and landing page content.
This allows our publishers to decide what they would like to show or not on their websites. Below, we will be explaining how you can set these flags on your ad spots. 

However, it is really important for publishers to understand that deselecting too many flags may negatively affect your CPM. For the best performance, we recommend that you keep the number of deselected flags within minimum level.  By this way, all advertisers within our inventory will be able to target your website/s under the audience of their campaigns. 

HOW TO APPLY AND EDIT FLAGS ON AD SPOTS? 

  1. Applying Flags on A New Ad Spot 

As a publisher, if you create a New Ad Spot, first of all you need to log in to your admin panel through www.runative.com and go to your dashboard. Click on the Publisher Menu, and go to Manage Ad Spots section. Here, first you need to add your website on your account after our compliance team reviews your website and decides to approve it, you are able to create your ad spots. 

When you create the ad spot, as a publisher you can decide which type of vertical, landing page, ad image you will be showing on your website/s by selecting or deselecting any campaign element from our flag system. To see all these flags, please click on the Rules box on Banner Settings section you will find all the flags used to categorise the campaigns in our inventory :

     
2) Applying Flags or Editing Flags on Existing Ad Spots 

In order to apply new flags to existing ad spots, please select Manage Ad Spots in Publisher Menu. Click on Ad Spot List, you will find the Edit button next to the ad spot you want to edit and deselect any campaign elements which you don't wish any longer to appear on your website.



HOW FLAG SYSTEM WORKS ON RUNATIVE? 

  1. Verticals

The first category on our flag system is Verticals. Here, campaigns are categorised by the type of verticals to allow each publisher to set specific rules for different ad spots and verticals to be promoted on their website. When a campaign has been flagged for a specific vertical and there are listed websites under that flag, that campaign will not be receiving traffic from that website(s).


     2. Landing Page 

The second category on our flag system is Landing Pages. Here, campaigns are categorised by the type of landing pages that website users will be directed after they click on the ads. This category helps publishers to have specific rules for the landing pages they will be showing to their audience. 

The different flags used under this category specify the characteristics of the Landing Pages and help the publisher to establish the red lines for the content promoted on these landing pages. 

For example: If you want to run only soft dating campaigns without a landing page including any type of provocative imagery or sexual activity, you can deselect both grades of these flags. However, if you feel comfortable having campaigns with landing pages that have moderate provocative imagery or sexual activity. Then you can deselect just Grade 2 of the given flag, and only let the campaigns from Grade 1 running on your ad spots. 

      

 

For your best practice, let's have a look at what is the difference between grades. Below, you will be seeing the definition and examples of Grade 1 and Grade 2.

2.1 Landing page contains implied or overt nudity

Grade 1: Landing page with the mild depiction of nudity. For example, an image showing female or male with partial nudity. This includes women wearing bikinis, sporty undergarments, mini skirts. Images depicting bare male chest also are going under this grade.

Grade 2: Landing page with significant amount nudity. For example, an image with close up depicting female wearing G-strings, thongs. Any kind of transparent clothes or item that is just hiding genitals and the person can be considered as nude but covered.

Real case

This is a landing page of a dating campaign and it will be flagged as 2.1 landing page contains implied nudity grade 1.

As it is explained above we can see partial nudity, women wearing bikinis and bare male chest. If this kind of landing suits you, you can safely select grade one of this flag.
Now let's take a look on an example for 2.2 landing page contains implied nudity grade 2.

Here we can see that the person can be considered as nude but he or she is still covered. Landing does not depict any kind of adult content, for example, nipples or genitals. 

So you can select your preferences from the listed ad spots in the “Flags” field. If there is a flag, you will not be receiving traffic on that specific landing from the listed ad spots, but you will still receive traffic from all the other selected ad spots.

      3. Aggressive Landing Page Behaviour

Within this category, publishers can select or deselect aggressive landing page behaviour. For example: Landing page with unnecessary aggressive flashing, Landing page hosted on a free/discounted domain name, Landing page triggering one or more, pop-unders, Javascript pop-ups, entry pop-ups, exit pop-ups. 

      4. Inappropriate Ad Image or Headline

Inappropriate Ad Image or Headline category gives our Publishers the opportunity to use different flags and different grades within the same flags In order to establish the red lines for the ad images and headlines to be promoted on the ad spots they place on the websites.

4.5 Ad image contains provocative position
Grade 1: Ad images depicting real people in a mildly provocative way with an intention to provoke sexual interest on the audience. For instance, an image of a girl wearing a sexy outfit, a girl is sitting on her bed. Here, a big part is upon the context like position or mimics.

Grade 2: Ad images depicting real people in a moderate provocative way, with an intention to provoke sexual arousal on the audience. Images are sexually explicit by means of body language. For example, an image with a girl taking off her clothes in a sexually suggestive way, showing sexy lingerie.

Real Case
Let's have a look at a real case. This is an example of flag 4.5 Ad image contains provocative position grade 1. Ad image can be considered a bit provocative, despite the fact that the woman is fully dressed the image still contains the intention to provoke sexual interest.

on the other hand 4.5 Ad image contains provocative position grade 2 case is more explicit, here the ad image is more provocative as it contains sexy lingerie and body language is more suggestive.

  • In such a case, you can add banners that do not possess these features. Select your preferences from the listed ad spots in the “Flags” field. If there is a flag, you will not be sending traffic on that specific banner/URL from the listed ad spots, but you will still send traffic from all the other selected ad spots.

In order to have detailed information on how campaigns are flagged and how flag system works, we highly recommend taking a closer look at our guidelines

  • Once again, we underline the importance of understanding that deselecting flags may affect heavily your CPM, for that reason as RUNative we recommend you get in touch and get detailed information from your Account Manager if you have any further questions or any request regarding the ad spots.

Lastly, after using our flagging system if you happen to see a campaign you do not wish to show on your website, please get in contact with your Account Manager and let her/him know about your request and feedback. Please remember to report it with a screenshot of the ad image, a URL link, geo information and time lapse when it happens. By this way, our Compliance Team will fix the issue as soon as possible and provide you feedback. 

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